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ACKNOWLEDGING THE PAST THAT ENSURED OUR FUTURE

Acknowledging the Past that Ensured Our Future Written by Apsipistoo (Evans Yellow Old Woman) Oki Niksokowa, nistoo’unohk Apsipistoo, nitohmto’to Siksikawa.  Hello my friends, my name is Apsipistoo, which is my Siksika name. It was gifted to me by my late great grandmother Koomakii, who hailed from the Blood Tribe. My name means White Owl.  My…

BEAUTY AND STRUGGLE: INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY 2021

Written by Sandra Lamouche June is National Indigenous History Month, and June 21 of this year marks the 25th year of celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day in Canada. With over 300 First Nations, Metis and Inuit nations we have a lot to celebrate! As an award winning educator and a champion women’s hoop dancer, this is…
Close up of green leaves from below with sunshine above and a sun spot creating an orange ring.

CRAFTING MEANINGFUL LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Beginning in September 2020, Ever Active Schools began to question our practice of territory land acknowledgements. The tipping point for some staff could be expressed in the words of Kay Ho: “Oftentimes, when non-Indigenous organizers make a territory acknowledgement, it is done hastily, and then discarded.” (2014, An Introduction to Settler Colonialism: Part Three) This…

A TRADITIONAL FOODS CAMP IN ENOCH, ALBERTA

Written by Chelsea Cattroll, Ever Active Schools Once upon a time, in a not-so-distant past, Ever Active Schools and Edmonton Public School Board (EPSB) launched a project called Miyomahchihowin (“In Good Health” in Cree). This project aimed to support pathways to employment and post-secondary education for Indigenous youth. Fast forward a few years and new…

MY HEART IS FULL: COMBATING COVID-19 THROUGH TRADITIONAL SKILLS

Written by Chelsea Cattroll, Ever Active Schools, with support from Dr. Kevin wâsakâyâsiw Lewis, kâniyâsihk Culture Camps We turn to the land when we are stressed to re-connect to ourselves and become grounded. During a time that can be perceived as stressful and turbulent, I have seen that many people are starting to return to…

INDIGENOUS STUDENTS ATTEND SUMMIT TO STRENGTHEN RESILIENCE

MORE THAN 300 STUDENTS, TEACHERS, COMMUNITY MEMBERS AND ELDERS FROM FIRST NATIONS AND METIS COMMUNITIES ACROSS ALBERTA GATHERED AT WINSPORT IN CALGARY ON NOVEMBER 27 AND 28 FOR A SUMMIT ON HEALTH, WELLNESS AND RESILIENCE.  The two-day event began with a host of active icebreaker activities that saw students interacting with new faces right off…

CELEBRATING NATIONAL INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY

It is our hope that every student in Alberta experience the diversity of Indigenous cultures on National Indigenous Peoples Day! Every year on June 21, schools all across the nation take the opportunity to celebrate Indigenous culture and history.

RESILIENCY SUMMIT 2018: RECAPPED

Written by: Kayli McClelland, Creative Media Specialist, Ever Active Schools THIS YEAR’S RESILIENCY SUMMIT HAS LEFT OUR WHOLE TEAM PUMPED FOR NEXT YEAR ALREADY! Although we had some big changes this time around, we still had a successful two days of learning, sharing and celebrating. More than 30 school teams from across Alberta representing Treaties…
Traditional games

TRADITIONAL GAMES AT KITASKINAW SCHOOL, ENOCH

Written by: Megan Jones, School Health Facilitator, Ever Active Schools I recently had the opportunity to spend five months at Kitaskinaw School, in Enoch, and felt lucky to have so much time to connect with the staff and students. A grant with Sport for Life initially brought me to the school and it gave me…

13 TIPS AND IDEAS FOR CELEBRATING NATIONAL INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY IN YOUR SCHOOL

Written by Sissy Thiessen, Resiliency Coordinator, Ever Active Schools Every year on June 21, schools all across the nation take the opportunity to celebrate Indigenous culture, history and contributions for National Indigenous Peoples Day. A way that many schools commemorate this special day is by hosting school-wide activities and celebrations. Many Alberta school jurisdictions have…

Indigenous Youth Wellness Collaborative

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Building Better Relationships for a Stronger Collective Impact

There is incredible diversity within the organizations partnering with First Nations and Métis communities in Alberta to support youth wellness. The Indigenous Youth Wellness Collaborative is an effort to foster relationships among these different organizations, allowing lessons to be shared across the province and highlighting the innovation, creativity and new resources developed by the communities and their partners.

Each organization has their own way of working, their own funding, and their own partnerships within the communities. It is the diversity of the work that makes this group so interesting! The Collaborative doesn’t seek to align all of our work, but instead ensures we aren’t working in isolation or duplicating one another. Rather than reinventing the wheel, we share successes, challenges and great ideas. We don’t all work in the same ways or the same places, but the shared goal of active, healthy and resilient youth and communities unites us.

If your community has a local program that you would like to highlight to the group, you would like to partner with any of the organizations, or if your organizations supports Indigenous youth wellness and you would like to join the Collaborative, please contact one of our Resiliency Coordinators below.

Partners: